Gallow Field Road
Foxton
Market Harborough
Leicestershire
LE16 7QZ

Telephone: 01858 545 328

Covid

Welcome Back

School Procedures

Start of the Day – we ask that children do not arrive before 8.45am, unless attending Breakfast Club.  All children are expected to be at school by 8.55am for registration, the gates will be locked at 8.55am.  Children who arrive in school after 8.55am must enter the school via the school office.  The one-way system is no longer in operation.

Breaktime – All children have a morning break of 15 minutes, from 10.15am until 10.30am.  We will be reviewing the timing at the end of September.

Lunchtime – We will gradually be reintroducing our ‘Lunchtime Family Dining’ system where the children are grouped across the year groups.  The children will eat their lunch in the school hall.

The cost of school meals for children in Years 3, 4, 5 & 6 are £2.35 per meal (£11.75 per week).  Please remember that meals need to be paid for in advance.  Children in Fox Cubs, Year 1 and 2 are all entitled to a free school dinner, this can be everyday or just occasionally.

Home time – The school day ends at 3.20pm, the gates will open at 3.15pm.  After School Care is available until 5.30pm if you are not able to collect your child/ren at this time.

Breakfast Club – operates from 8.00am in our hall, £2.00 for supervision, £2.60 for supervision and breakfast.  Breakfast served from Tuesday 31st August – fruit juice, cereal, toast.

After School Care – until 5.30pm, please book places in advance, there is a limit to the number of children who can attend therefore, unless we have reached the maximum number of children for a particular day, we will still take one off or emergency bookings.

 

Schools Covid-19 Operational Guidance

The guidance for schools has changed following the move to Step 4 of the Roadmap.  This marks a new phase in the government’s response to the pandemic, moving away from stringent restrictions on everyone’s day-to-day lives.  As COVID-19 becomes a virus that we learn to live with, there is now an imperative to reduce the disruption to children and young people’s education – particularly given that the direct clinical risks to children are extremely low, and every adult has been offered a first vaccine and the opportunity for 2 doses by mid-September.

 

Mixing and ‘Bubbles’

It is no longer recommend that it is necessary to keep children in consistent groups (‘bubbles’).  This means that assemblies can resume, and we no longer need to avoid mixing at lunch.

 

However, our outbreak management plan includes the reintroduction of ‘bubbles’ for a temporary period, to reduce mixing between groups.

 

Close Contacts and Isolation

Children under the age of 18 years old will no longer be required to self-isolate if they are contacted by NHS Test and Trace as a close contact of a positive COVID-19 case.  Instead, children will be contacted by NHS Test and Trace, informed they have been in close contact with a positive case and advised to take a PCR test.

 

Control measures

We will:

 

  1. Ensure good hygiene for everyone.  Regular hand washing or use of hand sanitiser.

 

  1. Maintain appropriate cleaning regimes.  There will be regular cleaning of areas and equipment, with a particular focus on frequently touched surfaces and the toilets.

 

  1. Keep occupied spaces well ventilated.  Where possible windows and doors will be open.

 

  1. Follow public health advice on testing, self-isolation and managing confirmed cases of COVID-19.  Pupils, staff and other adults should not come into school if they have symptoms, have had a positive test result or other reasons requiring them to stay at home due to the risk of them passing on COVID-19 (for example, they are required to quarantine).  If anyone in school develops COVID-19 symptoms, however mild, they will be sent home and booked for a PCR test.  Staff will undertake twice weekly lateral flow tests until the end of September, when this will also be reviewed.  Staff and pupils with a positive lateral flow test result should self-isolate in line with the stay at home guidance for households with possible or confirmed coronavirus (COVID-19) infection.  They will also need to get a PCR test to check if they have COVID-19.

 

Whilst awaiting the PCR result, the individual should continue to self-isolate.If the PCR test is taken within 2 days of the positive lateral flow test, and is negative, it overrides the self-test LFD test and can return to school, as long as the individual doesn’t have COVID-19 symptoms.

Risk Assessment

 

Employers must protect people from harm.  This includes taking reasonable steps to protect staff, pupils and others from coronavirus (COVID-19) within the education setting.

 

Assessing the Risk

L – Likelihood

Rating

Description

Rare

1

May occur only in exceptional circumstances

Unlikely

2

Unlikely to occur

Possible

3

Reasonable chance of occurring

Likely

4

Will occur in most circumstances

Almost Certain

5

More likely to occur than not

 

C – Consequences

Rating

Description

Insignificant

1

Minor impact injury which will not affect the person

Minor

2

Minor injury, first aid required

Moderate

3

Semi-permanent injury/damage lasting up to 1 year

Major

4

Significant or permanent injury (loss of/use of limb) Major injury, reportable under RIDDOR

Catastrophic

5

Unexpected death of a pupil, member of staff, visitor or helper. Adverse high-profile national media coverage

 

When the likelihood and consequences are multiplied together the scores give a risk rating of between 1 and 25 on the matrix.

 

Likelihood of risk

Consequences/Severity

Insignificant (1)

Minor (2)

Moderate (3)

Major (4)

Catastrophic (5)

Rare (1)

1

2

3

4

5

Unlikely (2)

2

4

6

8

10

Possible (3)

3

6

9

12

15

Likely (4)

4

8

12

16

20

Almost Certain (5)

5

10

15

20

25

 

 

 

Risk Level

Rating

Actions

Required Responsibility

Low

1-3

Managed through normal school measures & practices.

 

Managed by Class Teachers and support staff ongoing.

Moderate

4-6

Review control measures through formal risk assessment.

 

Managed by Head Teacher.

High

8-12

Review control measures through formal risk assessment. Trip leader to ensure all actions are monitored and implemented. High level hazards identified and monitored.

Specific Risk assessment hazard required by Head Teacher.

Serious

15-25

As per High but immediate actions required to reduce risk.

 

Risk Assessment required and supplied to the Chair of Governors.

 

Overall, I judge the likelihood of risk to be ‘possible’ with a consequence of ‘catastrophic’.  This gives a score of 15 with a ‘serious’ risk level.

A plan has been devised to reduce the risk following the government’s guidance for Foxton Primary School:

 

Hazard

People Harmed

Risk Control

Further Action

Action by who

Action by when

Tick when complete

Risk Scoring

Staff in School

L

C

Contracting or transmitting Coronavirus.

All

  1. Do not come to work if you have coronavirus symptoms or go home as soon as these develop (informing Head Teacher) and access a test as soon as possible.
  2. Clean your hands more often than usual – with running water and soap and dry them thoroughly or sanitiser ensuring that all parts of the hands are covered.
  3. Use the ‘catch it, bin it, kill it’ approach for coughs and sneezes.
  4. Avoid touching your mouth, nose and eyes.
  5. Clean frequently touched surfaces often using antibacterial spray.
  6. Think about ways to modify your teaching approach to keep a distance from children in your class as much as possible, particularly close face to face support.
  7. Consider avoiding calling pupils to the front of the class or going to their desk to check on their work if not necessary.
  8. Help your class to follow the rules on hand cleaning, not touching their faces, ‘catch it, bin it, kill it’ etc. with reminder posters.
  9. Where possible, prevent your class from sharing equipment and resources.
  10. Where possible, keep your classroom door and windows open for air flow.
  11. Limit the number of children from your class using the toilet at any one time.
  12. Limit your contact with other staff members, and don’t congregate in shared spaces.

 

All staff in school have been provided with COVID-19 Self Tests (Rapid Antigen Test) to be carried out on Sunday and Wednesday evenings.  Results are reported to K Raymakers.

All staff

On-going

 

3

5

 

 

Hazard

People Harmed

Risk Control

Further Action

Action by who

Action by when

Tick when complete

Risk Scoring

In Classrooms

L

C

Contracting or transmitting Coronavirus.

All

  1. School to provide equipment needed for each child.
  2. Surfaces to be wiped down after lunch.
  3. Children bring their own water bottle.

 

 

All staff

On-going

 

3

5

 

Hazard

People Harmed

Risk Control

Further Action

Action by who

Action by when

Tick when complete

Risk Scoring

Cleaning

L

C

Contracting or transmitting Coronavirus.

All

  1. Frequently touched surfaces should be wiped down twice a day – lunchtime and before school.
  2. Toilets – clean frequently touched surfaces after break time, after lunchtime & before school.
  3. Derek will complete enhanced cleaning from 6.30am each morning.  Tables, toilets, handles, equipment will be disinfected and carpets vacuumed.  Any shared equipment to be disinfected.

 

 

Toilets cleaning sign sheet.

All staff

On-going

 

3

5

 

Hazard

People Harmed

Risk Control

Further Action

Action by who

Action by when

Tick when complete

Risk Scoring

Visitors

L

C

Contracting or transmitting Coronavirus.

All

Only essential visitors for educational/maintenance/contractors.

  1. Use hand sanitiser when entering the building.

 

  1. K Raymakers records visitor’s details.

 

  1. Where possible remain socially distance from everyone, if not wear a face covering.

 

  1. School is well ventilated – where possible windows and doors open.

Governors meetings in the staffroom, five maximum.

Face coverings / hand sanitiser / social distancing measures.

All staff

On-going

 

3

5

 

 

 

As you know, the Prime Minister announced on 12 July that Step 4 of the roadmap would go ahead on 19 July. 

One of the key changes that will take place from 19 July is that education and childcare settings will no longer be asked to conduct routine contact tracing. As with positive cases in any other setting, NHS Test and Trace will work with either the positive case – or in the case of children – the parents, carers or guardian of the positive case to identify close contacts. 

NHS Test and Trace already manages the contact tracing process for the rest of society – including children who have recorded a positive PCR test – and has expertise in supporting people to identify close contacts. 

Here are more details of how that process will work and what you need to do if your child tests positive for COVID-19.

Self-isolating and taking a test

  1. If your child has symptoms, they and other members of the household should self-isolate – and you should inform their education or childcare setting. You should immediately order a PCR test for them. If the PCR result is negative, they and other members of their household can stop self-isolating (unless instructed to self-isolate for other reasons). If the PCR result is positive, they, other members of their household and any close contacts identified by NHS Track and Trace must self-isolate until 10 days after the onset of symptoms.

 

  1. If your child has a positive result from a lateral flow device (LFD) test, they and other members of the household should self-isolate – and you should inform their education or childcare setting. You should immediately order a confirmatory PCR test. If the confirmatory test is taken within two days and the result is negative, they and other members of their household can stop self-isolating (unless instructed to self-isolate for other reasons). If the confirmatory PCR test is positive (or is taken more than two days after the LFD), other members of their household and any close contacts identified by NHS Track and Trace must self-isolate until 10 days after the LFD test.

  2. PCR tests can be booked online through the NHS Test & Trace website or by calling 119. 

  3. PCR test results will be recorded with NHS Test and Trace automatically, but you should also communicate the result to the education or childcare setting during term time or summer provision.

Contact tracing

  1. If your child gets a positive PCR test result, NHS Test and Trace will contact you, using the details you registered when ordering the PCR test. You and/or your child will be asked a series of specific questions designed to identify who your child has been in close contact with. Being in an education or childcare setting with someone who has tested positive for COVID-19 will not necessarily mean a person is identified as a close contact. 

 

  1. You will be asked to provide the contact details, if you know them, of any of the individuals – or their parents or guardians – who have been identified as close contacts. NHS Test and Trace will then get in touch with these close contacts and provide appropriate instructions or advice (see below).

 

Self-isolation and/or testing of close contacts

 

 

  1. At present, anyone identified as a close contact is legally required to self-isolate and must not attend their education or childcare setting (the only exception is if they are participating in a daily contact testing trial). Anyone identified as a  non-household close contact by NHS Track and Trace must self-isolate until 10 days after the date of their most recent contact with that person. If they live in the same household, they must self-isolate until 10 days after the date of that person developing symptoms (see point 1 above) or, if that person was asymptomatic, the date of their test (see point 2 above). NHS Test and Trace will notify you of the day on which the self-isolation period ends.

  2. Close contacts are also advised to take a PCR test. If the test result is negative, they must still complete the full self-isolation period, as the test will not detect all positive cases. If the result is positive, they will need to self-isolate for a further 10 days – and NHS Test and Trace will contact them to identify any close contacts. 

  3. From 16 August, if the close contact is under 18, they will not have to self-isolate (in line with the policy for fully vaccinated adults) but will be asked to take an PCR test immediately, other than for very young children identified as non-household contacts, and they will not need to self-isolate while awaiting the results of the test. If the PCR test is positive, they will be required to self-isolate for 10 days from the date of the test. NHS Test and Trace will then get in touch to identify close contacts (see points 5 and 6 above). Further guidance on these changes to self-isolation will be provided shortly.

Schools Covid-19 Operational Guidance

Overview

As the country moves to Step 4 of the roadmap, the government continues to manage the risk of serious illness from the spread of the virus. This marks a new phase in the government’s response to the pandemic, moving away from stringent restrictions on everyone’s day-to-day lives, towards advising people on how to protect themselves and others, alongside targeted interventions to reduce risk. As COVID-19 becomes a virus that we learn to live with, there is now an imperative to reduce the disruption to children and young people’s education - particularly given that the direct clinical risks to children are extremely low, and every adult has been offered a first vaccine and the opportunity for 2 doses by mid-September.

Our priority is for you to deliver face-to-face, high-quality education to all pupils. The evidence is clear that being out of education causes significant harm to educational attainment, life chances, mental and physical health.

We have worked closely with the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) and Public Health England (PHE) to revise this guidance.

 

Mixing and ‘bubbles’

We no longer recommend that it is necessary to keep children in consistent groups (‘bubbles’). This means that bubbles will not need to be used for any summer provision (for example, summer schools) or in schools from the autumn term. If your school is still open in the week commencing 19 July, you may wish to continue with these measures until the end of your summer term.

As well as enabling flexibility in curriculum delivery, this means that assemblies can resume, and you no longer need to make alternative arrangements to avoid mixing at lunch.

You should make sure your outbreak management plans cover the possibility that in some local areas it may become necessary to reintroduce ‘bubbles’ for a temporary period, to reduce mixing between groups.

Any decision to recommend the reintroduction of ‘bubbles’ would not be taken lightly and would need to take account of the detrimental impact they can have on the delivery of education.

Tracing close contacts and isolation

Settings only needed to do contact tracing up to and including 18 July. Close contacts will now be identified via NHS Test and Trace and education settings will no longer be expected to undertake contact tracing.

As with positive cases in any other setting, NHS Test and Trace will work with the positive case to identify close contacts. Contacts from a school setting will only be traced by NHS Test and Trace where the positive case specifically identifies the individual as being a close contact. This is likely to be a small number of individuals who would be most at risk of contracting COVID-19 due to the nature of the close contact. You may be contacted in exceptional cases to help with identifying close contacts, as currently happens in managing other infectious diseases.

From 16 August 2021, children under the age of 18 years old will no longer be required to self-isolate if they are contacted by NHS Test and Trace as a close contact of a positive COVID-19 case.

Instead, children will be contacted by NHS Test and Trace, informed they have been in close contact with a positive case and advised to take a PCR test. We would encourage all individuals to take a PCR test if advised to do so.

18-year-olds will be treated in the same way as children until 4 months after their 18th birthday, to allow them the opportunity to get fully vaccinated. At which point, they will be subject to the same rules as adults and so if they choose not to get vaccinated, they will need to self-isolate if identified as a close contact.

Settings will continue to have a role in working with health protection teams in the case of a local outbreak. If there is an outbreak in a setting or if central government offers the area an enhanced response package, a director of public health might advise a setting to temporarily reintroduce some control measures.

Face coverings

Face coverings are no longer advised for pupils, staff and visitors either in classrooms or in communal areas.

The government has removed the requirement to wear face coverings in law but expects and recommends that they are worn in enclosed and crowded spaces where you may come into contact with people you don’t normally meet. This includes public transport and dedicated transport to school or college.

Stepping measures up and down

You should have outbreak management plans outlining how you would operate if there were an outbreak in your school or local area. Given the detrimental impact that restrictions on education can have on children and young people, any measures in schools should only ever be considered as a last resort, kept to the minimum number of schools or groups possible, and for the shortest amount of time possible.

Central government may offer local areas of particular concern an enhanced response package to help limit increases in transmission.

If you have several confirmed cases within 14 days, you may have an outbreak.

Control measures

You should:

  1. Ensure good hygiene for everyone.

  2. Maintain appropriate cleaning regimes.

  3. Keep occupied spaces well ventilated.

  4. Follow public health advice on testing, self-isolation and managing confirmed cases of COVID-19.

  5. 1. Ensure good hygiene for everyone

    Hand hygiene

    Frequent and thorough hand cleaning should now be regular practice. You should continue to ensure that pupils clean their hands regularly. This can be done with soap and water or hand sanitiser.

    Respiratory hygiene

    The ‘catch it, bin it, kill it’ approach continues to be very important.

    The e-Bug COVID-19 website contains free resources for you, including materials to encourage good hand and respiratory hygiene.

    Use of personal protective equipment (PPE)

    Most staff in schools will not require PPE beyond what they would normally need for their work. The guidance on the use of PPE in education, childcare and children’s social care settings provides more information on the use of PPE for COVID-19.

    2. Maintain appropriate cleaning regimes, using standard products such as detergents

    You should put in place and maintain an appropriate cleaning schedule. This should include regular cleaning of areas and equipment (for example, twice per day), with a particular focus on frequently touched surfaces.

    PHE has published guidance on the cleaning of non-healthcare settings.

    3. Keep occupied spaces well ventilated

    When your school is in operation, it is important to ensure it is well ventilated and that a comfortable teaching environment is maintained.

    You should identify any poorly ventilated spaces as part of your risk assessment and take steps to improve fresh air flow in these areas, giving particular consideration when holding events where visitors such as parents are on site, for example, school plays.

    Mechanical ventilation is a system that uses a fan to draw fresh air or extract air from a room. These should be adjusted to increase the ventilation rate wherever possible and checked to confirm that normal operation meets current guidance and that only fresh outside air is circulated.

    If possible, systems should be adjusted to full fresh air or, if this is not possible, then systems should be operated as normal as long as they are within a single room and supplemented by an outdoor air supply.

    Where mechanical ventilation systems exist, you should ensure that they are maintained in accordance with the manufacturers’ recommendations.

    Opening external windows can improve natural ventilation, and in addition, opening internal doors can also assist with creating a throughput of air. If necessary, external opening doors may also be used (if they are not fire doors and where safe to do so).

    You should balance the need for increased ventilation while maintaining a comfortable temperature.

    The Health and Safety Executive guidance on air conditioning and ventilation during the COVID-19 pandemic and CIBSE COVID-19 advice provides more information.

    DfE is working with Public Health England, NHS Test and Trace, and the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) on a pilot project to measure CO2 levels in classrooms and exploring options to help improve ventilation in settings where needed.

    4. Follow public health advice on testing, self-isolation and managing confirmed cases of COVID-19

    When an individual develops COVID-19 symptoms or has a positive test

    Pupils, staff and other adults should follow public health advice on when to self-isolate and what to do. They should not come into school if they have symptoms, have had a positive test result or other reasons requiring them to stay at home due to the risk of them passing on COVID-19 (for example, they are required to quarantine).

    If anyone in your school develops COVID-19 symptoms, however mild, you should send them home and they should follow public health advice.

    If a pupil in a boarding school shows symptoms, they should usually self-isolate in their residential setting so that their usual support can continue, others may then benefit from self-isolating in their family home.

    For everyone with symptoms, they should avoid using public transport and, wherever possible, be collected by a member of their family or household.

    If a pupil is awaiting collection, they should be left in a room on their own if possible and safe to do so. A window should be opened for fresh air ventilation if possible. Appropriate PPE should also be used if close contact is necessary. Further information on this can be found in the use of PPE in education, childcare and children’s social care settings guidance. Any rooms they use should be cleaned after they have left.

    The household (including any siblings) should follow the PHE stay at home guidance for households with possible or confirmed coronavirus (COVID-19) infection.

    Asymptomatic testing

    Testing remains important in reducing the risk of transmission of infection within schools. That is why, whilst some measures are relaxed, others will remain, and if necessary, in response to the latest epidemiological data, we all need to be prepared to step measures up or down in future depending on local circumstances.

    Over the summer, staff and secondary pupils should continue to test regularly if they are attending settings that remain open, such as summer schools and out of school activities based in school settings. Schools will only provide tests for twice weekly asymptomatic testing for pupils and staff over the summer period if they are attending school settings. However, testing will still be widely available over the summer and kits can be collected either from your local pharmacy or ordered online.

    As pupils will potentially mix with lots of other people during the summer holidays, all secondary school pupils should receive 2 on-site lateral flow device tests, 3 to 5 days apart, on their return in the autumn term.

    Settings may commence testing from 3 working days before the start of term and can stagger return of pupils across the first week to manage this. Pupils should then continue to test twice weekly at home until the end of September, when this will be reviewed.

    Staff should undertake twice weekly home tests whenever they are on site until the end of September, when this will also be reviewed.

    Secondary schools should also retain a small asymptomatic testing site (ATS) on-site until further notice so they can offer testing to pupils who are unable to test themselves at home.

    There is no need for primary age pupils (those in year 6 and below) to test over the summer period. They will be offered the 2 tests at an ATS at the beginning of the autumn term when they start at their secondary school as a new year 7. Schools may choose, however, to start testing year 6 pupils earlier, including in summer schools, depending on their local circumstances.

    Confirmatory PCR tests

    Staff and pupils with a positive LFD test result should self-isolate in line with the stay at home guidance for households with possible or confirmed coronavirus (COVID-19) infection. They will also need to get a free PCR test to check if they have COVID-19.

    Whilst awaiting the PCR result, the individual should continue to self-isolate.

    If the PCR test is taken within 2 days of the positive lateral flow test, and is negative, it overrides the self-test LFD test and the pupil can return to school, as long as the individual doesn’t have COVID-19 symptoms.

    Additional information on PCR test kits for schools and further education providers is available.

    Other considerations

    All clinically extremely vulnerable (CEV) children and young people should attend their education setting unless they are one of the very small number of children and young people under paediatric or other specialist care who have been advised by their clinician or other specialist not to attend.

    Further information is available in the guidance on supporting pupils at school with medical conditions.

    You should ensure that key contractors are aware of the school’s control measures and ways of working.

    Admitting children into school

    In most cases, parents and carers will agree that a pupil with symptoms should not attend the school, given the potential risk to others.

    If a parent or carer insists on a pupil attending your school, you can take the decision to refuse the pupil if, in your reasonable judgement, it is necessary to protect other pupils and staff from possible infection with COVID-19. Your decision would need to be carefully considered in light of all the circumstances and current public health advice.

    Attendance

    School attendance is mandatory for all pupils of compulsory school age and it is a priority to ensure that as many children as possible regularly attend school.